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GU Cancers 2018 | Differences in survival rates among non-urothelial bladder cancers

Jeanny Aragon-Ching, MD, FACP, of Inova Schar Cancer Institute, Falls Church, VA, discusses the differences in survival rates of non-urothelial bladder cancer patients at the Genitourinary Cancers Symposium 2018, held in San Francisco, CA. Dr Aragon-Ching discusses how rare non-urothelial bladder cancers are, considering how non-urothelial neoplasms account for less than 5% of bladder neoplasms. Her group studied the SEER database and found that, of the different types of non-urothelial bladder cancers, adenocarcinomas had the best outcome. Contrastingly, research suggests squamous cell carcinomas have the poorest outcome. Dr Aragon-Ching emphasizes the need to develop clinical trials specifically targeting these rare diseases, in order to reduce mortality rates and increase patient survival rates.

Transcript (edited for clarity)

We had a big interest in non-urothelial bladder cancers because of the rarity of it for one, as well as the difficulty and challenges in both diagnosing and treating these patients. As a lot of people know, urothelilal bladder cancers make up the most common type of bladder neoplasms and non-urothelial neoplasms actually make up less than 5%.

We were tasked with looking at the SEER database, which is a publicly run U...

We had a big interest in non-urothelial bladder cancers because of the rarity of it for one, as well as the difficulty and challenges in both diagnosing and treating these patients. As a lot of people know, urothelilal bladder cancers make up the most common type of bladder neoplasms and non-urothelial neoplasms actually make up less than 5%.

We were tasked with looking at the SEER database, which is a publicly run U.S. NCI based database, to look at the incidences and trends for mortality for these non-urothelial bladder cancers. Non-urothelial actually spans across a lot of different histologies; we have adenocarcinomas, squamous cell and neuroendocrine type sarcomas. What we found was that they were rare and their mortality rates and survival rates are actually in their disfavor. We found that of all the non-urothelial bladder cancers, adenocarcinoma patients probably fare the best as their median survival is 176 months and their five-year relative survival rate is a little over 50%. The worst performers were the squamous cell as well as the small cell carcinomas. I think this would leverage us for future information in terms of developing clinical trials that are geared towards these patients with non-eurothelial bladder cancers with a poor prognosis.

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