VJOncology is committed to improving our service to you

Share this video  

VJOncology is committed to improving our service to you

ASCO 2021 | Sotorasib: first targeted approval for KRAS G12C mutated NSCLC

KRAS mutations are represent one of the most frequent oncogene aberrations in patients with lung cancer and has historically been seen as a non-druggable target. Despite this, in May 2021, the first KRAS-targeted treatment was approved by the FDA for locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Sotorasib is an irreversible KRAS G12C inhibitor that has been granted breakthrough therapy designation based on the findings of the CodeBreaK 100 trial (NCT03600883). Pasi Jänne, MD, PhD, Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, Boston, MA, talks on the implications of this approval and what it may lead to in the future. This interview took place at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2021 Virtual Meeting.

Transcript (edited for clarity)

Certainly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer, or KRAS-mutant cancer in general, has become a very hot topic recently with the development, and now approval, of the first KRAS G12C inhibitor. So KRAS G12C mutations make up about 50% of KRAS mutants in lung cancer and so it’s a very big population of lung cancer patients. And having the first agent, sotorasib, be approved for G12C mutant lung cancer is certainly welcome for this group of individuals, who prior to this approval really didn’t have any targeted therapy options and were typically treated with chemotherapy and/or immune checkpoint inhibition...

Certainly, KRAS-mutant lung cancer, or KRAS-mutant cancer in general, has become a very hot topic recently with the development, and now approval, of the first KRAS G12C inhibitor. So KRAS G12C mutations make up about 50% of KRAS mutants in lung cancer and so it’s a very big population of lung cancer patients. And having the first agent, sotorasib, be approved for G12C mutant lung cancer is certainly welcome for this group of individuals, who prior to this approval really didn’t have any targeted therapy options and were typically treated with chemotherapy and/or immune checkpoint inhibition.

So we hope this is one of many to come and we hope this builds up a new foundation for future combination studies and also for future attempts to target the other KRAS mutations that are found across a wide variety of cancers.

Read more...

Disclosures

Dr Jänne reports consultancy to Daiichi Sankyo and receives sponsored research support from Daiichi Sankyo.

Sign-up for our Newsletter!

Keep up to date with all the latest news with our monthly newsletter