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ASCO 2022 | JAVELIN Bladder 100: Avelumab maintenance for metastatic or locally advanced bladder cancer

Joaquim Bellmunt, MD, PhD, Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, discusses the JAVELIN Bladder 100 study (NCT02603432), which investigated avelumab maintenance therapy for patients with metastatic or locally advanced bladder cancer. Patients who did not progress after receiving 4-6 cycles of first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy were randomised to receive either avelumab maintenance plus best supportive care vs best supportive care alone, with a primary endpoint of overall survival. Results published in 2020 showed a significant survival benefit for avelumab maintenance therapy. This interview took place at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2022 Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL.

Transcript (edited for clarity)

The JAVELIN 100 trial was a trial conducted as first line therapy, that in fact, it was first line therapy connected to maintenance therapy. Patients who had bladder cancer, metastatic, locally advanced, that were receiving cisplatin based chemotherapy, either cisplatin-gemcitabine or carboplatin-gemcitabine, if they did not progress, they were randomized after four, six cycles to receive avelumab maintenance, plus best supportive care, or best supportive care alone...

The JAVELIN 100 trial was a trial conducted as first line therapy, that in fact, it was first line therapy connected to maintenance therapy. Patients who had bladder cancer, metastatic, locally advanced, that were receiving cisplatin based chemotherapy, either cisplatin-gemcitabine or carboplatin-gemcitabine, if they did not progress, they were randomized after four, six cycles to receive avelumab maintenance, plus best supportive care, or best supportive care alone. This happened in between four, ten weeks after completing the four, six cycles of chemotherapy. The main endpoint was overall survival, and the results of this trial were published in the New England Journal in 2020, where for the first time, giving maintenance avelumab in patients that did not progress to first line chemotherapy, a survival benefit was observed. The main difference in survival was seven months in patient, comparing avelumab maintenance versus best supportive care.

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