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ASCO 2022 | CAR-T cell therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer

Ian Chau, MD, FRCP, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation, London, UK, explores the role of CAR T-cell therapies in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. Previously published data have demonstrated promising results for the use of Claudin 18.2-targeting CAR T-cells in gastric cancer, however, challenges include time to manufacturing. This interview took place at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2022 Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL.

Transcript (edited for clarity)

CAR T is a very interesting strategy in solid tumors, including gastro cancer. So the primary data that was presented in ASCO last year, coming from China, which is now fully published, does show a very early promising results of using CAR T in gastric cancer. There, they’re using Claudin18.2 as a target, to engineer the CAR T. Now, the challenge, which again, based on, because one of my other roles is actually treating lymphomas, where I use CAR T as a standard therapy for my lymphoma patients...

CAR T is a very interesting strategy in solid tumors, including gastro cancer. So the primary data that was presented in ASCO last year, coming from China, which is now fully published, does show a very early promising results of using CAR T in gastric cancer. There, they’re using Claudin18.2 as a target, to engineer the CAR T. Now, the challenge, which again, based on, because one of my other roles is actually treating lymphomas, where I use CAR T as a standard therapy for my lymphoma patients. We do recognize some of the challenges that we might face if we treat solid cancer patients. So partly is the time from actually harvesting the cells from patients, manufacture the cells and going back to them, because all that can take a certain amount of time.

Speaker 1: (01:09)
In some of these patients, whether they can wait that long for the disease, not to progress so quickly and able to infuse the cells back and have enough time for the CAR T to work. I think some of the challenge would be, at what time point do we think that we need to start harvesting cells and make CAR T and store them? If you do it too early, then there might be a lot of patients who do not require it for a long time or who may not require it at all. If you’re too late, then their cancer can’t wait enough time for the patient to be still well enough to gain the benefit from CAR T.

Speaker 1: (01:53)
So I think there is a fine balance between efficacy, the logistic of delivering the treatment and how long you can wait to give the patient the treatment. I think all these will, no doubt that efficacy will be very exciting, but there is many things in the balance that we really have to do in order to deliver this if treatment to patients.

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